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Tour 2017

 
 
Their shows are noted for their deep passion and high energy.
— -The Daily Progress

Music

WOB’s sound is a throwback to bands such as the Allman Brothers and Marshall Tucker Band — with shades of Bruce Springsteen, Bob Seger, the Eagles, Simon and Garfunkel and even Glen Campbell. But don’t mistake this for a country band... this album just plain rocks
— Huffington Post
one of the most pure and raw voices that I can think of.
— Beatdropping.com
There’s a human spirit thing going on with Will. It shows throughout the album in a way that is rare. A unique, trademark voice, Will’s is one you recognize and gravitate to. This is particularly compelling when wrapped around a rhythmically circling hook, dripping biscuit gravy.
— No Depression

Meet Will

 

The music of Will Overman is at once melodic as it is relentless, as refreshingly unique as it is familiar and evocative.

Overman’s music is rooted deeply in the South yet transcends genres and convention, blending essential elements of rock, blues, country toward a collective swell reminiscent of the Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Marshall Tucker.

A Virginia native, Overman -- who made it through two levels of NBC’s “The Voice” -- pairs sleek vocals with haunting rhythm and introspective melody.  He takes on love, life and loss. All with an edge driven deep in reality.

Whether performing solo or with a full band, Overman is a young Bruce Springsteen, (think “Nebraska”). He’s a folksinger and a rocker (think “Born to Run”), fronting a talented group of musicians swinging from flawless riffs to intoxicating beats.

Overman is quickly building a reputation as a fan favorite at music festivals including MerleFest, Rooster Walk Music and Arts Festival, Front Porch Fest and Appaloosa Roots Music Festival. He’s slated to play at the 2017 Lynchstock and is a finalist in the “Rockn to Lockn” contest. And he recently submitted this to NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert.

Will Overman Band’s debut album, released in June 2016, is a nod to Southern fried rock at its finest and most influential. The self-titled release includes boogie rhythms and driving guitar leads. His lyrics extol the values, aspirations and excesses of Southern working-class young adults.

The single, "All I Say," showcases the band's myriad talents, combining an upbeat tempo with lyrics laced with regret of unrequited love.

A trip through the first and the last cut on this 58-minute album — produced by Dave Stipe at Monkeyclaus Studio in Nelson County — leaves listeners surprised and elated. Thoughtful and reflective.

The release was mixed at the studio of another Charlottesville artist, Sons of Bill’s Sam Wilson, who cameos on the pedal steel on “Son.”

No Depression also gave the album high praise in this review. “Overman's record lays it all out, a rich start for an auspicious musical career.”

Overman, a 23-year-old senior at the University of Virginia, is a son of the South. His love for his home state resonates throughout the album lyrically and melodically.

The Huffington Post writes:

“WOB’s sound is a throwback to bands such as the Allman Brothers and Marshall Tucker Band — with shades of Bruce Springsteen, Bob Seger, the Eagles, Simon and Garfunkel and even Glen Campbell. But don’t mistake this for a country band or try to categorize them as Americana. Because as lush as the melodies and the lyrics are — they appear to be written by someone much older — this album just plain rocks. Just as you’re lost in a haunting melody, the electric guitar, bass and drums kick in. You’d also never know that this band has been perfecting its sound together for mere months rather than years.”

WOB’s debut album is full of reverence for their roots, honest reflection, and is a personal statement by a young band taking their first steps on the long journey ahead. As part of that journey, WOB has played hundreds of shows from Burlington, Vermont, to Columbus, Ohio, to NYC and Washington, D.C., to Nashville and Knoxville, Tennessee. In between WOB is working on a new album.

The music of WOB — call it “amped-up folk rock” — is as energetic as it is passionate. It can be haunting and evocative yet sincere, sweet. Musically and lyrically, the band draws from its Virginia roots, producing a rare combination of enticing harmony and straight-ahead, hard-charging rhythm and riffs.

Drawing comparisons to The Avetts and Jason Isbell, the band carries an unwavering commitment to its music — and to its fans. That music and those lyrics, as the Huffington Post wrote, seems to draw “ … from the experiences of someone much older.” Soulful and unforgettable. Addictive and sometimes playful. Meaningful and real. Those factors, plus a transcendent passion and unyielding commitment to craft, are what truly define this rising, must-see group of talented young musicians.

 

 

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